Day 167 – Working with Macro and Depth of Field

Maralee_Park_Day 167_00001  f/4.5 taken about a foot away from the subject
Maralee_Park_Day 167_00001 f/4.5 taken about a foot away from the subject
Maralee_Park_Day 167_00002  f/22 taken about a foot away from the subject
Maralee_Park_Day 167_00002 f/22 taken about a foot away from the subject

I’m still working with my new macro lens and depth-of-field.  I’ve found that even when I use a small aperture, the depth-of-field is still fairly shallow with the macro lens.  And with a large aperture, the depth-of-field is miniscule.  And it changes quite a bit just moving a few inches from the subject.

Maralee_Park_Day 167_00003  f/22 taken about 6" from subject
Maralee_Park_Day 167_00003 f/22 taken about 6″ from subject
Maralee_Park_Day 167_00004  f/4.5 taken about 6" from subject
Maralee_Park_Day 167_00004 f/4.5 taken about 6″ from subject

All of these photos were taken on a some sort of pine bush in our front yard.  It’s an interesting bush – it has pinecones, little purple things that I think are pine cone wannabes, and tiny pine cone clusters with pine needles growing out of them.  Someone out there may know what kind of bush this is.

We have more thinks growing in the yard now so I will have lots of opportunities to do more playing around with the macro lens.

Maralee_Park_Day 167_00005  f/8 taken a few inches from subject
Maralee_Park_Day 167_00005 f/8 taken a few inches from subject

Maralee

20 Replies to “Day 167 – Working with Macro and Depth of Field”

  1. For me number 2 is the best shot, but it’s very close to photo no 1. Try to give the shots higher ISO when you work with marco . Keep on playing. Take the same object with higher ISO and you will see the difference

  2. When I can, I shoot macro with the camera on the tripod.

    When I can’t, I change the focus option to a single point, and set the camera to only fire when in focus. It guarantees something will be in focus, and if I shoot multiple shots I may get lucky and something I want ends up in focus.

    All bets are off if one is outside and even the barest breath of wind.

    The pine/shrub looks familiar, but I can’t place where I’ve seen it. Sorry.

      1. Don’t know what camera you are using . . . the Nikon I have has three focusing modes:

        Single – by default pressing the shutter button will not actually fire unless focus is achieved. Presuming the subject is not moving much, and the lighting is good, this should be fairly transparent to the user, but depending on the situation it can result in a shutter lag. The A1 setting in the menu of my camera can change the default to snap the picture regardless if focus is achieved.

        Auto – this bridges the gap between continuous and single, and pressing the shutter button will take the picture regardless if focus is achieved.

        Continuous – this basically will adjust the focus continuously, but pressing the shutter will take the picture regardless if the subject is in focus or not. The A2 menu setting in my camera can override this setting to only release when focus is achieved.

        In addition, the last two options have subject tracking options where once focus is achieved, if the subject moves in the frame, the camera will track it and keep focus on it.

        I believe you said you were using the D200, and it has the same options, or at least mine does.

      1. These are separate settings. You choose the combination you want between selecting the focus choice, and what happens when you press the shutter button.

        When I am shooting macro hand-held I set it to single with focus priority, or continuous with focus priority. As long as I don’t sway a whole lot, or the subject is being blown about vigorously, it ups the odds of getting something in focus.

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